Fashion N Travel

TRENDING FASHION IN SERBIA

The Pannonian Plain and the Balkans meet in Serbia, formally the Republic of Serbia, a landlocked nation in Southeast and Central Europe. In addition to claiming a border with Albania through the disputed territory of Kosovo, it shares land borders with Hungary to the north, Romania to the northeast, Bulgaria to the southeast, North Macedonia to the south, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the west, Montenegro to the southwest, and North Macedonia to the southeast. There are around 8.6 million people living in Serbia and Kosovo. The largest city is Belgrade, the country’s capital.

According to the Human Development Index, Serbia has an upper-middle income economy and is rated 64th overall. It is a member of the UN, CoE, OSCE, PfP, BSEC, CEFTA, and is applying to join the WTO. It is also a unitary parliamentary constitutional republic. The nation has been in membership talks with the EU since 2014 with the goal of joining by 2025. Officially, Serbia upholds the principle of military neutrality. The nation offers its residents free elementary and secondary education as well as universal health care.

TRENDING FASHION IN SERBIA

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ACCESSORIES IN SERBIA

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TRIBES IN SERBIA AND THEIR FASHION

The Celtic

A Celtic Iron Age cultural group known as the Scordisci had its geographic core at the confluence of the Savus (Sava), Dravus (Drava), Margus (Morava), and Danube rivers, which is the area that is now Serbia. They consolidated into a tribal state and were historically significant from the start of the third century BC until the turn of the common era. At their height, their primary area covered sections of what are now modern-day Serbia, Croatia, Bulgaria, and Romania, and their influence was considerably more widespread. Their territory were incorporated into the Roman provinces of Pannonia, Moesia, and Dacia during the Roman conquest in the first century AD.

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The Dacians
They were the prehistoric Indo-Europeans who lived in the Dacian cultural zone, which was west of the Black Sea and close to the Carpathian Mountains. They are frequently regarded as a branch of the Thracians. This region mostly consists of Romania and Moldova as they exist today, along with portions of Ukraine, Eastern Serbia, Northern Bulgaria, Slovakia, Hungary, and Southern Poland. The language of the Dacians is the Dacian, which is disputedly related to the nearby Thracian language and may perhaps be a subgroup of it. The nearby Scythians and the Celtic invasions of the fourth century BC had some cultural effect on the Dacians.

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TOURIST AND HISTORICAL PLACES IN SERBIA

Studenica Monastery – There are many monasteries in Serbia that should be recognized for their spiritual significance and aesthetic value. The exquisite frescoes within the white marble buildings are nearly as impressive as the structures themselves, which are already impressive.

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Sremski Karlovci – Sremski Karlovci is tiny enough to stand alone as a tourist destination. The first Serbian high school and one of the state’s most elegant fountains are both located on a single square that serves as the focal point of the town.

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Šargan Eight – the Šargan Eight route is a charming tiny railway close to Mokra Gora and another famous Serbian location according to Emir Kusturica. The tracks appear to be a figure eight from the air, but it is obviously quite challenging to determine this from the ground.
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Oplenac – located just outside of Topola’s main town is the church of Oplenac. The amazing mosaic that covers the walls of the actual church almost probably outshines the crypt in terms of interest. A more magnificent mosaic is hard to envision.

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Petrovaradin Fortress – the most romantic dining location in all of Vojvodina is the Petrovaradin Fortress, which overlooks the city and the Danube. The famed EXIT Festival turns the citadel into a huge party during the summer, however it is best to enjoy its beauties sober and in quiet.
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The Skull Tower – However, given that these are the palpable remnants of centuries of harsh Ottoman domination, this monument in Ni is a significant reminder to sacrifice. Less than 60 of the tower’s original 952 skulls are still present.

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Golubac fortress – this is the most picturesque stronghold in the country; thus, it is understandable why so many people have attempted to take it over the course of history. The majority of Serbia’s strongholds offer stunning views from the inside, but you must observe this one from a distance.

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Gamzigrad – this is a Roman settlement from the third century that has a lot to offer in the present day. There are numerous temples, palaces, and works of amazing art, with the Grand Temple dominating them all.

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Drvengrad – a tiny hamlet in the west of the country, is home to some of Serbia’s most laid-back residents and has streets named after famous figures from popular culture.

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House on the Drina – a group of swimmers needed a more pleasant place to rest, so they built the house in 1969, adding to the Drina river’s fame. The little House on the Drina is one of the cutest pictures ever.

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Uvac Canyon – No place in Serbia’s beautiful natural surroundings attracts and delights visitors in equal measure, but Uvac Canyon does it best. The meanders are as dramatic as river bends can be, and they appear to have been designed by someone with a broad definition of “bend” and an overactive imagination. The magnificent Uvac Canyon is created when you combine craggy rocks, wild animals, and the powerful Drina river.

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Kalemegdan – the centerpiece of any journey to the city is Kalemegdan, a renowned fortress that encloses the best park and conceals museums and monuments. In addition to centuries of conflict and upheaval, this location is the most romantic in the city. Without visiting Kalemegdan, no journey to the capital is complete.

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Josip Broz Tito –  All generations today miss Josip Broz Tito, a communist leader with a unique style who was incredibly well-liked. Tito is interred in Belgrade, and the elegantly titled House of Flowers is home to his mausoleum.

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Church of St. Sava – this is accurate both literally and figuratively, given how the imposing structure dominates the urban setting. The enormous church, which was constructed on the site where St. Sava’s relics were destroyed by the Ottoman occupiers, is every bit as intimidating as a house of God should be.

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Subotica City Hall – The town’s City Hall, an early 20th-century building that exhibits an outstanding attention to detail and then some, is the best example of Art Nouveau architecture in the nation. At your own risk, choose to ignore this border village in Hungary.

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MUSIC IN SERBIA

Serbian music embodies the nation’s rich musical past, both ancient and contemporary. It features a number of traditional music genres that are a part of the larger Balkan musical history and each have their own unique sound and features.

Throughout medieval Serbia, choirs or lone singers sang church music. The Octoechos, a collection of religious songs honoring Jesus, served as the inspiration for the songs sung at the period. In addition to court music and traditional music, which are less well known, Serbia had both during the medieval era. Musicians who performed at the royal court under the Nemanji dynasty were referred to as sviralnici, glumci, and praskavnici.

For ages, Serbian and Balkan music has included the singing of epic poetry. These lengthy poems, which deal with historical and mythological topics, are often sung or performed in the highlands of Serbia and Montenegro while being accompanied by the gusle, a one-string fiddle.

 

Some musicians in Serbia include:

Emir Kusturica

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Sara Jo

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Some art work in Serbia include:

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 MEALS IN SERBIA

Moravska Salata – this salad is an authentic Serbian dish that came from Nis and Leskovac region.

Muckalica – a classic Serbian dish that originated in Leskovac, which is mix, shake and combine.

Serbian Christmas Bread – a perfect dinner of Serbian people in their traditional Christmas cannot be done without the existence of  the Cesnica.

Tripe  soup – a delicious dish that clearly show Serbian culinary culture.

Srpska Salata – this Serbian-style salad is favoured in the whole nation and even in other countries.

Srpska Proja – this is the most famous staple for Serbian peasants.

Moravska Salata

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Muckalica

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Serbian Christmas Bread

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Tripe soup

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Srpska Salata

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Srpska Proja

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Pasulj – it is a renowned soup in many other countries including Serbia.

Urnebes – it is made by combinig salty cheese, cooked egg yolks, sour cream, garlic, roasted peppers, paprika and some oil.

Lepinja – a delicious flat bread in Serbia.

Kiflice – a delicious bread in Serbia that look like French croissants.

Goulash – a delicious traditional Serbian recipe that is made of meat, vegetables and spices.

Balkan Butter Bread – Serbian flatbread baked directly on a fireplace.

Pasulj

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Urnebes

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Lepinja

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Kiflice

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Goulash

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Balkan Butter Bread

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION AND HABITAT PROTECTION IN SERBIA

Serbia is a country of rich ecosystem and species diversity – covering only 1.9% of the whole European territory Serbia is home to 39% of European vascular flora, 51% of European fish fauna, 40% of European reptile and amphibian fauna, 74% of European bird fauna, 67% European mammal fauna. Its abundance of mountains and rivers make it an ideal environment for a variety of animals, many of which are protected.

Serbia is regarded as a middle-forested nation with forest covering 29.1% of its land, compared to a global average of 30% for the world and 35% for Europe. Serbia has a total forest area of 2,252,000 ha, or 0.3 ha per resident, of which 1,194,000 ha, or 53%, are controlled by the government and 1,058,387 ha, or 47%, are owned privately. Oak, beech, pine, and fir trees are the most prevalent trees.

Serbia has amazing natural beauty. Because of this, it is home to some magnificent animals. There are 90 animal species, 381 bird species, and over 2000 different butterfly species in the nation. Of course, there are also many fish and insects. On the other side, it is extremely rare to witness some wild creatures in Serbia because of how endangered they are. It is not impossible, though. The nation is home to a wide variety of creatures, including lynx, brown bears, and wild cats.

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EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN SERBIA

Droughts, floods, abnormally harsh winters, and other weather-related extreme occurrences have had a substantial negative influence on Serbia’s economy over the past 20 years, particularly the agricultural sector, resulting in significant physical damage, monetary losses, and even fatalities.

More than 50 days in 2012 saw temperatures rise above 35 degrees Celsius, which cost more than $141 million in damages and more than one million acres of lost agricultural production damages. More than 1.5 million people (20% of the population) were impacted by one of the worst floods and heaviest rainfalls ever in 2014, which also resulted in $2 billion in losses.

According to climate change estimates, there is a considerable likelihood that temperatures will continue to rise in Serbia and the Western Balkans as well as that longer and more frequent droughts and wildfires would occur.

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  GENDER EQUALITY IN SERBIA

Jadranka Joksimović – a Serbian politician who is serving as the Minister of European Integration in the Government of the Republic of Serbia.

Marija Obradović – Serbian politician serving as the Minister of Public Administration and Local Self-Government of Serbia.

Ana Brnabić – Serbian politician serving as the prime minister of Serbia.

 

Suzana Grubješić – Serbian politician who served as the Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia and also served on the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia.

Jadranka Joksimović

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Marija Obradović

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Ana Brnabić

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Suzana Grubješić

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Snežana Malović – Serbian politician and former Minister of Justice in the Government of Serbia.

Snežana BogosavljevićBošković – a politician and academic in Serbia. Previously served as minister of agriculture and environment in the first cabinet of AleksandarVučić, she is currently a legislator in the National Assembly of Serbia.

Diana Dragutinović –Serbian economist, who was Minister of Finance in the Government of Serbia .

Tatjana Matić – Serbian politician and a serbist. She is the current Minister of Trade, Tourism and Telecommunications in the Government of Serbia.

Snežana Malović

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Snežana BogosavljevićBošković

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Diana Dragutinović

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Tatjana Matić

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