Fashion N Travel

TRENDING FASHION IN MALAWI

TRENDING FASHION IN MALAWI

Malawi officially the Republic of Malawi, is a landlocked country in Southeastern Africa that was formerly known as Nyasaland. It is bordered by Zambia to the west, Tanzania to the north and northeast, and Mozambique to the east, south and southwest. Malawi spans over 118,484 km(45,747 sq mi) and has an estimated population of 19,431,566. Malawi’s capital and largest city is Lilongwe. Its second-largest is Blantyre, its third-largest is Mzuzu and its fourth-largest is its former capital, Zomba. The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name for the Chewa people who inhabit the area. The country is nicknamed “The Warm Heart of Africa” because of the friendliness of its people. The economy is heavily based on agriculture, and it has a largely rural and rapidly growing population. 

The part of Africa now known as Malawi was settled around the 10th century by migrating Bantu groups. Centuries later, in 1891, the area was colonized by the British and became a protectorate of the United Kingdom known as Nyasaland. In 1953, it became a protectorate within the semi-independent Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. The Federation was dissolved in 1963. In 1964, the protectorate was ended: Nyasaland became an independent country under Queen Elizabeth II, and was renamed Malawi. Two years later it became a republic. It gained full independence from the United Kingdom, and by 1970 had become a totalitarian one-party state under the presidency of Hastings Banda, who remained in this role until 1994. Today, Malawi has a democraticmulti-party republic headed by an elected president. 

TRENDING FASHION IN MALAWI

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ACCESSORIES IN MALAWI

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TRIBES IN MALAWI AND THEIR FASHION

The Chewa people

The Chewa (or AChewa) are a Bantu ethnic group from central and southern Africa who make up the majority of Malawi’s population. The Chewa are closely related to the Tumbuka and Nsenga peoples that live in the neighboring areas. The Phiri and the Banda are two significant Chewa clans, each with a population of 1.5 million people.

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The Lowme people

The Lomwe are one of Malawi’s four main ethnic groups, with a long history of crossing the Mozambique–Malawi border. Due to tribal warfare in Mozambique, many Lomwe moved to Malawi towards the end of the 19th century and mixed with the Chewa in the 1930s. The Elhomwe language spoken in Malawi is largely a Mihavane dialect, with remnants of Kokholha dialect in select places such as Thyolo.

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TOURIST AND HISTORICAL PLACES IN MALAWI

Mangochi – Mangochi is the hub for perhaps Malawi’s most-visited section of lakeshore.

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Liwonde National Park – The most accomplished wildlife spotting and safari area in all of Malawi, along the courses of the Shire River.

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Lilongwe – this one-million-strong capital represents the beating political and commercial heart of Malawi.

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Likoma Island –  it is also famed for its crystal-clear shore waters and unspoilt coastline, where the occasional fishing skiff offers the only interruption to a day spent snorkeling in the company of cichlid fish.

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Lake Malawi National Park – the lands of the Lake Malawi National Park are a must for both nature lovers and history buffs.

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Kasungu National Park – The Kasungu National Park is one of East Africa’s more off-the-beaten-track nature reserves.

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Karonga – Karonga is a great place to spend a night or two in this less-visited corner of the nation.

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Zomba – it sits on the edge of the Shire Highlands. The gateway to its eponymous plateau.

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Blantyre – A business-minded metropolis of nearly one million people, Blantyre is the only real rival to Lilongwe when it comes to competing for the crown for the economic kingpin of the nation.

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Nyika National Park – the largest of its kind in the entire country, and one of the most unique natural habitats in East Africa besides.

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Nkhotakota – most travelers go here, to seek out the acclaimed safari lodges that clutch the edge of the waters, to wonder at tropical birds and see elephants, buffalo and maybe even leopards in the wild.

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Mzuzu – The city itself has some interesting botanical gardens, and oodles of adventure tour providers that can organize treks in the surrounding mountains and hills.

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MUSIC IN MALAWI

The country is a rich soundscape of traditional beats, Pan-African rhythms, and global genres that have been given a very Malawian makeover. Malawi’s music scene today is a mishmash of the traditional and modern, the indigenous and foreign.

Over time, the wide range of traditional music in Malawi was appropriated and modernized by new musical influences, styles, and instruments. If you wander round the streets of Lilongwe on a Friday night, or stroll through downtown Blantyre, you can find locals jamming to a mix of the old and new. Similar to any town or city across the world, the old classics are beloved and continue to play on, but there is a new wave of artists putting their own stamp on Malawian music.

Jazz, Hip-Hop, Gospel, Reggae and Afrobeats feature as prominent genres of music you will hear when out and about in Malawi, with songs normally being sung in Chichewa, the national language.

 Some musicians in Malawi include

Maskal

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Malia

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Some art work in Malawi

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MEALS IN MALAWI

Malawi coffee ice cream – an amazing ice cream salted with caramel swirl recipe.

Mkhwani – it consists of pumpkin leaves, tomatoes and hefty amount of peanut floor.

Phala la Mgaiwa – a type of ground corn sweetened with some sugar and milk.

Zitumbuwa – this is made by making a dough with bananas, corn flour, spiced and deep fried.

Malawian fruit chutney – meal made from coriander, dried apricots, peaches, chili powder and spices.

Kachumbari – a delicious meal across Malawi, made with onions, tomatoes and spicy chili peppers.

Malawi coffee ice cream

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Mkhwani

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Phala la Mgaiwa

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Zitumbuwa

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Malawian fruit chutney

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Kachumbari

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Thobwa – a Malawian fermented drink that has a milky appearance, a cereal taste and a grainy texture.

Chikondamoyo –  quarter-loafed of white bread filled with a blistering-hot curry, Malawi’s most treasured snacks.

Peanut stew – a delicious Malawian dish made from peanut stew and spinach.

Sesame-coated sweet potato croquettes – a delicious Malawian dish.

Malawian Mbatata – a delicious cookies made from coconut.

Malawian coconut chicken curry – a stew made from dry roasting coconut and blending it together.

Thobwa

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Chikondamoyo

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Peanut stew

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Sesame-coated sweet potato croquettes

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Malawian Mbatata

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Malawian coconut chicken curry

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ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION AND HABITAT PROTECTION IN MALAWI

According to the U.N. FAO, 34.4% or about 3,237,000 ha of Malawi is forested according to FAO. Of this 28.9% (934,000) is classified as primary forest, the most biodiverse and carbon-dense form of forest. Malawi had 365,000 ha of planted forest and with a change in Forest Cover: Between 1990 and 2010, Malawi lost an average of 32,950 ha or 0.85% per year. In total, between 1990 and 2010, Malawi lost 16.9% of its forest cover, or around 659,000 ha.

Malawi has a system of forest reserves, the first of which were established over a century ago. Grazing and cultivation have encroached on many forest reserves, and many reserve forests have been replaced with exotic plantation trees including pine and eucalyptus.
Malawi’s forests contain 144 million metric tons of carbon in living forest biomass. Biodiversity and Protected Areas: Malawi has some 1029 known species of amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles according to figures from the World Conservation Monitoring Centre. Of these, 1.7% are endemic, meaning they exist in no other country, and 2.4% are threatened. Malawi is home to at least 3765 species of vascular plants, of which 1.3% are endemic. 8.9% of Malawi is protected.

Malawi is home to ten national parks and wilderness parks. Most species of big game are now restricted to these areas due to an increase in poaching over the last decade.

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EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN MALAWI

Malawi is vulnerable to climate change and extreme weather events (EAD, 1998, 2002a, 2004). The Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment Report of 2001 (EAD, 2002b) has clearly indicated that Malawi is experiencing a variety of climatic hazards, which include intense rainfall, floods, seasonal droughts, multi-year droughts, dry spells, cold spells, strong winds, thunderstorms, landslides, hailstorms, mudslides and heat waves, among many others.

Currently, the majority of rural communities are experiencing chronic food deficits in many parts of the country on a year-round-basis owing to the effects of floods and droughts. This situation has been compounded by the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS that has created a large number of dependent orphans, and has also adversely impacted on rural household food production systems, as well as the quality of life and sustainable livelihoods.

The increasing prevalence of the recurrent floods and droughts is of major concern to the Government of Malawi because of their far-reaching consequences on food, water, health and energy. Erratic rains have resulted in acute crop failure, despite concerted efforts to improve seasonal weather forecasting at the beginning of the rainy season. Crop failure has resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition, especially among vulnerable rural communities. On the other hand, floods have resulted in the disruption of hydroelectric power generation, water pollution, and increased incidences of diseases, such as malaria, cholera and diarrhea.

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GENDER EQUALITY IN MALAWI

The Malawi Gender and Development Index (MGDI) is the first index Malawi has ever produced to measure gender equality and women empowerment in the country. In 2009, Malawi joined the twelve African countries which piloted the Gender and Development Index that was initiated by the Economic Commission for Africa.

 

Thelma Kaliu – project coordinator of the Spotlight Initiative Project under Plan.

Tapiwa Gwaza – a Malawian popular actress.

Tujilane Chizumila – Malawian lawyer and jurist who was appointed to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Right.

Mary Shawa – current Principal Secretary of Ministry of Gender, Children, Disabilities and Social Welfare.

Thelma Kaliu

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Tapiwa Gwaza

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Tujilane Chizumila

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Mary Shawa

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Cecilia Chazama – a Malawian politician who served as the Minister of Home Affairs and Internal Security in the cabinet of Malawi.

Theresa Kachindamoto – the paramount chief or Inkosi of the Dedza District in the central region of Malawi.

Joyce Hilda Banda – Malawian politician who was the President of Malawi 2012 to 2014, she is also the founder and leader of People’s party.

Nancy Tembo – Malawian politician, currently serving as Minister of Foreign Affairs in Malawi.

Cecilia Chazama

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Theresa Kachindamoto

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Joyce Hilda Banda

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Nancy Tembo

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